Category Archives: african american book

5 Minutes, 5 Questions With… Tamyara Brown, author of “Gatekeeper of Secrets”

JoeyPinkney.com Exclusive Interview
5 Minutes, 5 Questions With…
Tamyara Brown, author of Gatekeeper of Secrets
(Tamluvstowrite Publications)

William H. Matter’s is keeping the secrets of the community saint, Bishop Gerald Goode. William appears every year at the church annual to murder and expose his father, the Bishop. What keeps William from doing the crime is his promise to his mother to protect his family at all costs. When William’s first love Tasiyana resurfaces, he must face his past mistakes.

When Bishop Goode throws his hat in the political ring to run for Mayor, he receives a letter blackmailing him . He will stop at nothing to protect his brand and his win to run his beloved city. William’s stepbrother Lee asks William and his brothers to join forces to reveal the dark truth about their father. Lives are in danger, and the secrets revealed will send you into shock. This is riveting tale of the man of the cloth, and under the sheep’s clothing is a wolf.

Joey Pinkney: Where did you get the inspiration to write Gatekeeper of Secrets?

Tamyara Brown: I wanted to write Gatekeeper of Secrets to discuss sexual assault among men. It is a subject that remains kept in the dark. I wanted to give a voice to the men afraid to share their story because of the guilt and stigma that comes along with it. We often ignore the signs among boys and young men molested – especially when it happens in the church. Continue reading 5 Minutes, 5 Questions With… Tamyara Brown, author of “Gatekeeper of Secrets”

5 Minutes, 5 Questions With… Maurice M. Gray, Jr., author of “Like A Brother”

JoeyPinkney.com Exclusive Interview
5 Minutes, 5 Questions With…
Maurice M. Gray, Jr., author of Like A Brother
(Write The Vision)

Jeremiah McAllister lost his entire family before he turned eighteen but was blessed with another one. As the oldest of more than a dozen young adults mentored by CC Dawson and her husband Thurman, Jeremiah takes his role as oldest brother within their chosen family seriously. To his siblings, he is a confidante, emergency contact, babysitter and family ATM. Whatever they need, he provides, no questions asked. However, some among them push his largesse to its limits.

Jenisse Anderson uses Jeremiah as a surrogate man on her arm for social events when she’s between boyfriends and as her personal 911 (she calls him to help her deal with anything she deems an emergency). Despite Jeremiah’s consistently being there for her, she will neither reciprocate nor discuss his feelings for her, or even deal with the issues of her past.

Erik Dawson (CC and Thurman’s only biological child) is currently estranged from his parents. He uses Jeremiah as a go-between so he knows they’re okay and vice-versa. Jeremiah’s repeated pleas for Erik to go to his parents and reconcile fall on deaf ears. Between Jenisse and Erik and the constant requests from the others, Jeremiah is pulled in too many different directions all at once.

As he reaches his breaking point, Jeremiah finds himself at a crossroads in his life. How can he break out of an emotional prison he didn’t even realize he was in until recently? Can he face his own history in order to embrace a better future?

Joey Pinkney: Where did you get the inspiration to write Like A Brother?

Maurice M. Gray, Jr.: From the phrase “you’re like a brother to me.” (Heard that from many women in my day.) And from being a recovering overworker, particularly in church. I envisioned a large extended family not actually blood-related but closer than some blood-kin are. Jeremiah is the oldest and the one the others tend to lean on. Continue reading 5 Minutes, 5 Questions With… Maurice M. Gray, Jr., author of “Like A Brother”

5 Minutes, 5 Questions With… Lance Oliver Keeble, author of “Globes Disease”

JoeyPinkney.com Exclusive Interview
5 Minutes, 5 Questions With…
Lance Oliver Keeble, author of Globes Disease
Keeble Ink Publishing

Jodi and her friends all suffer from the same affliction. Each of them has to deal with their struggles in their own personal way.

These unfortunate residents of the small quiet town of La Mort Douce must band together to face threats, which include a mysterious vampire, hunters who treat them like wild game and a government agency offering promises of a cure. With many more threats looming, this eclectic group must come together to achieve a common goal. They must fight for their humanity or die alone, like animals.

Globes Disease is thrilling, action-packed novel about lycanthropy seen through the eyes of seven brave souls who suffer from the disease. Do you have it?

Joey Pinkney: Where did you get the inspiration to write Globes Disease?

Lance Oliver Keeble: In 1985, I wrote a short story based on a question I had. “What if a black man was infected with lycanthrope?” I wrote about the character, Terry, walking down the street wondering if people were looking at him because he was infected or because he was black – “paranoia of the infirm,” if you will. As the story grew, so did the characters. It was a fun write. Continue reading 5 Minutes, 5 Questions With… Lance Oliver Keeble, author of “Globes Disease”